How One Company Invests Creatively in Education

DiplomaImagine approaching your high school graduation knowing you’re on the preferred list for a job with IBM.

That’s one of the differentiators of PTech, a new six-year, technology-oriented high school opening in New York City this fall with 130 ninth graders. A result of a public/private partnership, the school has the support of the IBM International Foundation.

Students, who come mostly from low-income homes, will have the opportunity to earn both a diploma and an associate’s degree.

IBM International Foundation President Stanley Litow, a former Deputy Chancellor of Schools for New York City, said the company “has given up ‘checkbook philanthropy,’” according to a story in The Wall Street Journal.

Instead, the company is aiming to improve the competitiveness of students in math and sciences by a closer involvement with developing the school’s curriculum and other aspects of the educational experience, including selecting the principal. One of the benefits of this approach is a better-trained workforce.

The article cites several facts: 30 percent of U.S. students fail to graduate from high school on time. They also lag behind their counterparts in other industrialized countries on math and science exams.

What do you think about this model of investing in education?

Many thanks to gadgetdude for diploma photo via Flickr.

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About creativeconsiderations

Christine Sullivan is a communications strategist with expertise in communications planning, writing and content development, and executive communications. She can be reached at mycreativeconsiderations@gmail.com.
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